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In the Philippines, the death toll from Typhoon Rai has surpassed 100

Authorities stepped up relief efforts on Sunday after Typhoon Rai, the worst tropical storm to hit the Philippines this year, struck on Thursday and Friday

In the Philippines, the death toll from Typhoon Rai has surpassed 100
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In the aftermath of Typhoon Rai, at least 72 people perished in the central Philippine province of Bohol, according to the provincial governor on Sunday, bringing the overall number of deaths in the country to more than 100.

Authorities stepped up relief efforts on Sunday after Typhoon Rai, the worst tropical storm to hit the Philippines this year, struck on Thursday and Friday. More than 400,000 people were displaced, homes were damaged, and electricity and communication cables were knocked off.

The national disaster service had already reported 31 deaths as a result of the storm, but these numbers did not include those in Bohol. The bureau stated that official reports from Bohol and other provinces were still pending.

The local administration in the southern province of Dinagat Islands reported 10 deaths on Sunday, but it was unclear whether those deaths had already been included in the disaster agency's official number.

According to officials, the majority of deaths were caused by falling trees and water.

Because communication and electricity lines have yet to be fully restored in many regions, authorities have found it impossible to present an accurate picture of the extent of the devastation.

Rai made nine landfalls, leaving a tremendous trail of destruction in the provinces of Cebu, Leyte, Surigao del Norte, including the famed Siargao surfing destination, and the Dinagat Islands. Rai was a category 5 storm at one point.

Trees were uprooted, roofs were toppled, houses were flattened, infrastructure was wrecked, and many towns were inundated, making it difficult to get much-needed food and water to the victims.

According to presidential spokeswoman Karlo Nograles, President Rodrigo Duterte's mandate was to "use all government resources to ensure that all commodities are delivered as soon as feasible" to calamity-stricken areas.

According to officials, the majority of deaths were caused by falling trees and water.

Because communication and electricity lines have yet to be fully restored in many regions, authorities have found it impossible to present an accurate picture of the extent of the devastation.

Rai made nine landfalls, leaving a tremendous trail of destruction in the provinces of Cebu, Leyte, Surigao del Norte, including the famed Siargao surfing destination, and the Dinagat Islands. Rai was a category 5 storm at one point.

Trees were uprooted, roofs were toppled, houses were flattened, infrastructure was wrecked, and many towns were inundated, making it difficult to get much-needed food and water to the victims.

According to presidential spokeswoman Karlo Nograles, President Rodrigo Duterte's mandate was to "use all government resources to ensure that all commodities are delivered as soon as feasible" to calamity-stricken areas.

Before moving toward the South China Sea over the weekend, Rai has displaced roughly 490,000 people in the Philippines.

Governor Arthur Yap of Bohol, which is home to some of the country's most famous tourist spots, including the Loboc River, which flooded, stated the number of deaths was based on only fragmentary reports, implying that the death toll might potentially grow.

In a video released to his Facebook account, he stated, "It is extremely evident that the damage inflicted by Bohol is great and all-encompassing." "In terms of demolished homes and agricultural losses, people have suffered significantly."

Every year, about 20 tropical storms reach the Philippines, producing flooding and landslides.

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